May in a Nutshell.

DSC_6660Hello everyone! It’s been a minute since we posted and we wanted to catch y’all up on our beautiful mess month of May. First of all, I landed the dream job, graduated, bought my first brand new car, then we got married on May 12th (we’ll do a post on the wedding soon), went on a little mini-moon to Glenwood Springs, and have been getting adjusted to our new schedules the last couple of weeks! It’s been a complete whirlwind, especially with family and friends coming in and out of town. I’m so excited to share the wedding photographs will you all, so here’s a little preview! I tear up a little each time we look through them, it was such a happy day surrounded by our close loved ones. Also, it’s been a while since we did a book recommendation, so Sam’s picks for May is Dune by Frank Herbert and The Martian by Andy Weir.¬†We hope your summer is off to a good start, and we can’t wait to keep you updated on our little adventures!

Take care,

The Wiesenbears

Book Review: Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary

pexels-photo-176103

Hey guys! Long time, no posts. The wedding and graduation are getting closer and closer, so it’s been a little hectic in our neck of the woods. However, I just finished reading a book I’ve completely fallen in love with, so I wanted to leave a little review with my thoughts on Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary! It was required for my Critical Theory class this semester, and honestly was such a nice break from Plato and Aristotle. It was the first book I had to read all semester that didn’t feel “assigned.” Our professor told us the book took five years to write, and the work put into it definitely paid off because it’s quite possibly one of the most beautifully written books I’ve ever read.

It switches perspectives from Charles Bovary to his wife after their marriage. Madame Bovary finds her personal life mundane, so she reads romance novels and compares her real life to them. She has a tendency to over romanticize how married life should be and feels unsatisfied when it doesn’t compete to the lives of the characters she reads about. Charles is oblivious to his wife’s fantasies and believes that they’re both happily in love. Flaubert has an interesting way of making the reader both roll their eyes at his characters and still want them to do well. So if you’re in the mood to try a new (gorgeous) book, be sure to check it out!

Take care,

The Wiesenbears